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#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <setjmp.h>
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static jmp_buf <a target="_blank" href="http://cm.bell-labs.com/who/dmr/">dmr</a>;
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static void
function(void)
{
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;printf("umquam\n");
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;longjmp(<a target="_blank" href="http://cm.bell-labs.com/who/dmr/">dmr</a>, 1);
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;printf("meminisse\n");
}
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int
main(void) {
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;if (setjmp(<a target="_blank" href="http://cm.bell-labs.com/who/dmr/">dmr</a>) == 0) {
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;printf("Noli\n");
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;function();
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;} else {
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;printf("oblivisci\n");
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;}
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
 
  1. Peano Arithmetic and Primitive Recursive Arithmetic proved Inconsistent (aided by a theorem-prover)
  2. Spam in Financial Networks
  3. Solving the Steve Perlman’s DIDO Controversy with MU-MIMO
  4. Estimating the Gains from Trade in the Market for Innovation: Evidence from the Transfer of Patents
  5. Doubling R&D just increase 22.5% new-product announcements vs. 31.3% of doubling company’s size
 

As a follow-up to my previous post about basic computer engineering laws, this recent chart depicting Koomey’s Law, teaching us that for a fixed amount of computational power, the need for battery will fall by half every 1.6 years, or the other way round, the energy efficiency of computers doubles roughly every 18 months; a real breadth of fresh air to the current trend to conserve energy in computing systems.

 
  1. Security impact of the Rizzo/Duong CBC “BEAST” attack: one of the SSL protocol authors on the BEAST attack
  2. CryptDB, with an implementation coming soon
  3. Insights on the evolution of computational complexity on Where do theorems go to die?
  4. Running CUDA Code Natively on x86 Processors
  5. Complexity of and Algorithms for Borda Manipulation
 

Life can only be understood backwards, but it must be lived forwards.”

Søren Kierkegaard

In technology, predicting the future is risky business. Tracing parallels and contrasts between future and old technologies, in the best tradition of Odlyzko’s papers on the comparative history of technology, is the only foolproof way to reason about the future, with the only shortcoming of being forewarned that in hindsight, everything is obvious and foreseeable. The following books are the best sources to learn about the rising of past-centuries networks, before the Internet:

  • Networks of Power: Electrification in Western Society. Through the looking-glass of Tom Hughes’ systematizing theory of Complex Systems, the best recollection of the battle of electrical standards (AC vs. DC), full of details of the similarities and differences of electric expansion in Germany, England and United States due to the impact of the state of affairs of each country.
  • Railroaded: the Transcontinentals and the Making of Modern America. As the first infrastructure built in capitalism, it transformed the legal-economic system of its day to the current one we live within. Its fact-based approach is the best strength of the narrative, which otherwise should be read with distance and perspective to properly detach from the author’s opinions.
  • Energy and the English Industrial Revolution. A masterpiece and the best short book on the Industrial Revolution, by one of the most important economic historian. You can get a taste of its content at this article written by the author itself.
 
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